Practice Hacks for Piano

Practice Hacks for Piano

Practice Hacks for Piano by Catherine Shefski

I’ve written a book! It’s a quick read for the Kindle and it’s available for download here on Amazon.com.

Inside Practice Hacks for Piano you will find succinct advice on topics such as finding the proper hand position, playing octave passages, and creating a full range of dynamics, to interpreting and memorizing music — this little book has a nugget of useful information on every page, much of which has been down from teacher to student for over a century. Written in short and concise sections, intermediate and advanced piano students and their teachers will find helpful and practical advice for getting the most from every practice session.

This e-book includes tips on the following topics: Hand Position, Stretching, Scales, Chords, Octaves, Playing Fast, Dynamics, Fingers, Staccato and Legato, Memorizing Music, and Performance.

I’d love to hear what you think! And if you like what you see please leave a review at Amazon. I sincerely appreciate it!

Finding Joy in Piano

It’s been a long time since I’ve written about piano, taught piano, or as a matter of fact, even played piano. But it took another blogger to write a post that inspired me to post again.

Elissa Milne (pianist, writer, teacher and composer) has written a piano teacher’s manifesto. In the manifesto she lays out the purpose for piano lessons. It is what frames her teaching, her expectations and her composing for students.  Every item on the list is spot-on and I find myself wishing I had a copy of this years ago to hand out to parents and students and to hang on the wall as a reminder to myself.

Elissa talks about the “cool stuff” students can learn to do at the piano and then moves on to talk about the emotional benefits of piano lessons. You learn to understand yourself better, as well as other people. You begin to understand your place in history. You engage your brain in a way unlike the way you do with any other activity. Perhaps most importantly, you play for the joy you feel when you’re able to share an effortless performance with an engaged audience.

So, in the spirit of finding the joy in piano once again, maybe it’s time to resurrect this blog. Just maybe.